Hiatus

Some Catholic prelates and business groups opposed the bishops' plan on the grounds that it was too radical. William Cardinal O'Connell of Boston, for example, believed some aspects of the plan were "socialistic," a word often used to describe what was viewed as too much government involvement in American society and the economy. Many Americans were inclined to share O'Connell's suspicions; the Red Scare in particular heightened fears of "Bolshevik" plots. As the 1920s progressed, Americans' lost their appetite for Progressive reform, and critics of the Bishops' plan gained traction. This section features documents that detail Ryan's frustration with his lack of progress, and critiques of the bishops' plan. The kind of reformism advised in the Bishops' Program would not find an audience again until the economy slid into the Depression in the 1930s.

 

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